Little Biddy Babies

This isn’t just about freedom of expression and safe spaces, this is about a re-juvenile devolution into profound social gridlock, driven by absurdity and nurtured by political fatigue.

In the dead of night a tragedy occurred. Starting at 3 in the morning, crews working in the city of New Orleans removed a famous statue of Jefferson Davis the first, and, thankfully, only president of the Confederate States of America. I call it a tragedy not because I especially like Jefferson Davis or sympathize with the Rebellion, but because of the temper tantrum which precipitated this removal and which may signal the removal of many other cultural monuments, perhaps including one to my hero Thomas Jefferson at Columbia University.

Human beings are complicated. It’s probably the thing I like about us the most. Human beings can be, and often are, a mixture of conflicts. We’re all hypocrites in one way or another.  Thomas Jefferson and Jefferson Davis (as well as many of the others on the proverbial chopping block) are no different. They can be loved and simultaneously despised. But perhaps its too much to ask a modern political society to think more holistically about historical and cultural matters- matters which often contain a great deal of nuance.

The drive to make these historical figures into “un-persons” (to borrow from Orwell) is only part of a much larger story of the infantilization of America. Whether left or right, Americans are becoming increasingly thin skinned. The Right likes to throw around the phrase “snowflake” when liberals shut down free speech rallies at Berkeley or lectures at Villanova,  but burn a flag in front of a conservative and they’ll become just as “triggered”. Even saying the word “rape” is apparently nearly the same as rape itself. We can’t seem to handle things we don’t like anymore. We have become children, wailing for mother. Notable lefty actor and comedian Stephen Fry even took heat for saying as much as Dave Rubin’s show.  To the millennial Left (and to a certain extent the Right) refusal to accept the whole slate of liberal positions makes you into an enemy of the people, and any act against you, whether violent or not, is justified.

This isn’t just about freedom of expression and safe spaces, this is about a re-juvenile devolution into profound social gridlock, driven by absurdity and nurtured by political fatigue. If you don’t like something, a statue, a speaker, an idea, then fight it. Throw eggs at the statue, protest the speaker, or come up with a better idea. Trying to erase those things you don’t like from the world is childish. If it’s really that traumatic for you to encounter something you don’t agree with that you literally can’t even, then maybe take a Xanax and get on with your life. Don’t deny me the opportunity to look at that statue of Jefferson Davis and reflect upon my own self and possibly come to greater conclusions about the world because of it. You don’t own my brain, so stop trying to control what goes into it.

Grow up.

Lament for Republican Intellectuals

Rush Limbaugh is no Ayn Rand

On January 13, 1978, notable Conservative intellectual and founder of the National Review William F. Buckley Jr. took on then Gov. Ronald Reagan about the pair of treaties that would divorce the United States from her control over the Panama Canal Zone. I have always been a fan of both Buckley and President Reagan (despite their faults), but I had never seen this particular debate until last night. Anyone familiar with either of them will no doubt be aware of how charming, amiable, and smart the two of them are, but Buckley stood out during the debate as the more erudite and the more intellectually rigorous.

This got me thinking about who among modern conservatives inherited Buckley’s mantle after his death in 2008. George Will is the obvious candidate. He is smart, largely impartial, and has a jovial style that reminds conservatives that it’s okay to take themselves less seriously. I also get the impression that Will see’s himself in this same light. But Will lacks the polysyllabic, ten-dollar-words Buckley is famous (or infamous) for. This is not a trite distinction.

But who else on the Right can claim Buckley’s intellectual inheritance? I don’t think anyone can. This has left the Right in a state of intellectual absence. There are few Republicans who can articulate positions and think through problems as clearly as Buckley, or even the much maligned Barry Goldwater. Rush Limbaugh is no Ayn Rand.

The left doesn’t seem to have this problem. They have Gore Vidal, the late Christopher Hitchens, Noam Chomsky, Ta-Nehisi Coates and others. Despite the many sins of the intellectual left, the fact remains that even the most capable of Right-wing thinkers, including my love Rand Paul, can’t stand up to the rhetorical challenge alone posed by people like Chomsky and Vidal. Perhaps this situation can be best explained by the fact that the left seems to have conquered the Académie, but I think the bigger issue is that conservatives no longer want intellectualism- and, without demand, the supply has simply dried up.

Look at Ted Cruz. Many on the right call Sen. Cruz an conservative intellectual heavy-weight, but I often find myself wishing he would make more thorough arguments rather than spending time trying to make himself seem like an “every-man”. Trying to appeal to the audience’s emotional senses is not the mark of true intellectualism. When a conservative does try to elevate the conversation, they are often maligned. This is not necessarily a new phenomenon. Daniel Patrick Moynihan was often the target of anti-intellectualism when he ran for Senate in 1976 (Moynihan’s Republican opponent, William F. Buckley’s older brother James,  often derisively referred to Moynihan as “Prof. Moynihan”). During the Republican primary race in 2007, Ron Paul was mocked for talking about the books he likes to read.

If sensible conservatives really want their party back from Trump’s vulgar populism, they have to start emulating Buckley and Will, not Bannon and Rush.

The Alt-Reich Within

“…as much as the alt-right has risen like a snake from within the GOP, occasionally that same snake has risen its head within “America’s Third Party…”

Despite what some media outlets would have you believe, libertarians, and the Libertarian Party, have very little to nothing in common with the “Alt-Right” phenomenon. The Libertarian Party has been at the forefront of Gay Rights and Civil Rights since the party’s founding in 1971. Most of my liberal friends understand this, but let me be clear. The Libertarian Party stands for equality, justice, and freedom- what was once called “the liberal ethic”. We just have a different perspective on how society goes about achieving those ends. However, it’s not as if the alt-right has no showing among libertarians. Indeed, as much as the alt-right has risen like a snake from within the GOP, occasionally that same snake has risen its head within “America’s Third Party”.

It seems like every time there is a major terrorist disaster carried out by Muslim extremists, there are calls from both sides of the aisle for the Muslim community to strongly condemn these acts. Perhaps its unfair to ask them to do so, but nevertheless, it’s time libertarians belly up to the bar and renounce the alt-right in the same way. There are figures associated with libertarianism that make most mainstream libertarians rather uncomfortable. Chief among these must be Lew Rockwell. For those of you unfamiliar, Lew Rockwell was, and has been for some time, an icon in the libertarian movement. Author of many books on liberal (small “l”) philosophy and government, and former Chief of Staff to Congressman Ron Paul, Lew is the person responsible (I’m almost certain) for Ron Paul’s racist and homophobic newsletters. Some of Lew’s whoppers include:

  • “…Given the inefficiencies of what DC laughingly calls the criminal justice system, I think we can safely assume that 95 percent of the black males in that city are semi-criminal or entirely criminal…”
  • “…even in my little town of Lake Jackson, Texas, I’ve urged everyone in my family to know how to use a gun in self defense[…] for the animals are coming…”
  • “…Boy, it sure burns me to have a national holiday for that pro-communist philanderer, Martin Luther King. I voted against this outrage time and time again as a Congressman. What an infamy that Ronald Reagan approved it! We can thank him for our annual Hate Whitey Day…”

I say that I’m almost certain that these were Lew’s words because he ran Congressman Paul’s newsletters in those days. No one has ever heard Dr. Paul say anything like that and everyone knows (in a ‘wink, wink, nudge, nudge’ kind of way) that Lew Rockwell has harbored more in common with neo-nazi George Lincoln Rockwell than anyone within the libertarian movement would like to admit. Well, I’ll admit it. I reject Lew Rockwell and his ilk.

I’m also not the first to do so. Libertarian blogger Jeremy Kolassa had this to say about Lew back in 2012.

Wait, that’s not true. He has done something [for the movement]: damaged it. I’m out here, trying to tell people about liberty and freedom, and all the time something comes up about how Ron Paul is a racist or that libertarians believe in crazy stuff or whatever. It hurts. It makes it difficult to spread the message of freedom to the country. And that’s what we have to do, you know: we have to convince others to join us, to educate them that it’s okay to hold onto their money and to have a small government (or no government at all, in some cases.) But how can I do that when I got Lew Rockwell sitting over my shoulder muttering something about how the Confederacy was the greatest thing on Earth, and how because I don’t have a paleo diet I’m not really a libertarian and thus nobody should be listening to me?

Come on.

Lew isn’t alone in the libertarian world, but if enough of us raise our voices in opposition to this peculiar form of Randian psychopathy, maybe we can double our vote counts again like we did this past election cycle.